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August 8, 2005

Cracks appearing in Canadian 'healthcare' system?

The Christian Science Monitor reports that, thanks to a ruling in Quebec, the first step may have been taken toward allowing private insurers to operate in Canada.

That is undoubtedly good news, but what is even more fascinating is the peek the article gives into the mentality of people who think the government should be the only dispenser of health care:
Allowing people to buy private health insurance violates fundamental rights, [Canadian Health Coalition coordinator Michael] McBane says, because not everyone will be able to afford it.
Given the realities of Canadian healthcare, McBane is arguing that everyone should be equally miserable and at risk of death due to the negligence of their government—a true legacy of socialism.

To further illustrate the absurdity of McBane's argument, we could try restating it in various ways:
  • Allowing people to buy houses violates fundamental rights, because not everyone will be able to afford them.
  • Allowing people to buy cars violates fundamental rights, because not everyone will be able to afford them.
  • Allowing people to buy personal computers violates fundamental rights, because not everyone will be able to afford them.
We could go on and on, but the point is made. Although I was trying to be absurd with these examples, in my mind's eye I'm imagining Mr. McBane staring at me for a moment before asking, "What's your point?"

The article is revealing in one other way: Many Canadians consider private insurance to be an American thing, and that fact alone increases political opposition to the idea. It appears that some there would literally rather die at the hands of their government before admitting that America was right about something.

2 comments:

Blue Cross of California said...

Interesting to hear there are cracks in the Canadian health care system as I always thought it was the best.

Car Man said...

You should sell cars.